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Using Climbing Gear for Bikes

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Using Climbing Gear for Bikes

Postby Josh Lewis » Wed Sep 23, 2009 1:58 am

Am I the only one who does this... Sometimes I use my personal Anchor (daisy chain) as part of my bike lock which I use the chain as the chain and use a normal pad lock which secures my stuff... am i the only one who does this? I have also used it as a leesh to walk my dog.
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Postby Woodzy » Wed Sep 23, 2009 3:55 am

I use my climbing helmet in substitute of my bike helmet just for kicks every so often
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Postby Visentin » Wed Sep 23, 2009 7:29 am

Woodzy wrote:I use my climbing helmet in substitute of my bike helmet just for kicks every so often


I cycled on few occasions from the climbing wall to home with my climbing shoes on :) Not too bad, except in winter ! :D
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Postby junodirtrider » Sun Sep 27, 2009 6:50 am

My leather mountaineering boots are a staple winter addition to my bike gear, but the daisy chain is one that is new(s) to me.
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Postby Visentin » Mon Sep 28, 2009 7:42 am

junodirtrider wrote:My leather mountaineering boots are a staple winter addition to my bike gear, but the daisy chain is one that is new(s) to me.


I cycled (or tried) occasionally with my old mountaineering boots when it was very cold, but I disliked the feeling of having the ankle stuck inside. The <a href="http://www.mbpost.com/trail/268966/dolina-suchej-wody.html">only time</a> I cycled up to a mountain-hut to hike further up I prefered to attach bags and keep them inside ! I have now in addition what we call "low hiking boots" and that's probably what I'll use in such circumtances for cycling when they'll be old
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Re: Using Climbing Gear for Bikes

Postby Malibu » Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:36 am

Josh wrote:Am I the only one who does this...
Yes :D

I have a few items that do double duty. My smaller hydration day pack gets year round use, the LED head lamp that I use for O:dark-thirty alpine climbs goes along on as an emergency light and head lamp for finishing rides in the dark and my light-weight climbing boots double as winter riding shoes.
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Postby junodirtrider » Fri Oct 16, 2009 5:58 pm

Josh there's a young fella on my Perseverance Trail wearing a climbing helmet... and he is boogyin' on that section!
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Postby RayMondo » Mon Oct 19, 2009 9:03 pm

For years I've used my "Tudor Sports" knee-length cycling trousers for winter mountaineering. They are quite a thick, stretch material with a fab fleece interior and elasticated knees. Really, really warm in biting winter gales. They are okay when wet for cycling, but you need to put on overtrousers if rain in the mountains.
TS110 “YORK” PLUSSES http://tudorsports.co.uk/index.html

For gloves, I use a pair of inner gloves for the bike, then a mit over them in the mountains. The mit having a grip palm so I can hold the ice axe or the bars well.

For tops, I use a wicking, synthetic long sleeved mountain tee-shirt for both activities. They really wick out the sweat. Believe me, a damp back in the mountains when you are at rest is a rotten and unsafe experience.

Heck, why don't I just get spiked ice tyres and just head up Mont Blanc!
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Postby hillbilly » Tue Oct 20, 2009 6:16 pm

Hey Ray, this set-up might help make your approach to Mont Blanc :-)
http://www.gizmag.com/go/6633/picture/29977/
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Mont Blanc

Postby RayMondo » Wed Oct 21, 2009 3:06 pm

That's a great idea! Though the first and last time I went to the region, despite that I was tearing along the Mer de Glace at 10,000ft and feeling immensely fit, I made the mistake to then go higher by the cable car. Man, in the night, altitude sickness hit me like a sledge hammer - shivering and the rest of it. I would have been fine if I'd walked (or biked) to 13,000ft and not made the jump.

Though since then, I've lived at over 4,000ft for many years, and when I've come down to sea level I hardly need to breath. So I guess my base level has remained elevated and thus I should be able to ascend much higher than before, without problems.

Sorry to have deviated on the topic, but useful info for anyone. Think I'll do a topic on that right now... Acclimatisation.
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Postby RayMondo » Wed Oct 21, 2009 5:22 pm

hillbilly wrote:Hey Ray, this set-up might help make your approach to Mont Blanc :-)
http://www.gizmag.com/go/6633/picture/29977/


And that Mountain Monk downhill only bike is also a great idea. It's compact, and the number of times I wished I had wheels to coast down with, I've lost count. Definitely a Will Smith "Man, I gotta get me one of these." ! Thanks a lot.
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Postby Malibu » Wed Oct 21, 2009 5:43 pm

hillbilly wrote:Hey Ray, this set-up might help make your approach to Mont Blanc :-)
http://www.gizmag.com/go/6633/picture/29977/


Don't know why, but I LOL'ed just a little. Cool devices but I don't know how practical they would be in the real world. The Monk downhill bike is a cool idea. I mean, people pack skis and snowboards for a quicker, easier and more thrilling descent on snow climbs. Why not wheels for those summer climbs? I would like a little pop-up saddle, though, for it to truly be easier on the knees.

Now, if I could find a ski resort with groomed slopes that would let me ride that snow bike kit... :)
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Postby hillbilly » Wed Oct 21, 2009 6:22 pm

Yeah - Though I have never tried it, I can't see the mountain snow bike working too well off-piste. It looks like it would be kind fun to try if the hardpack conditions were just right.

At 21 lbs (not real light) the mountain monk looks a bit tricky to me with the tiny wheels and body position (top heavy..?) I could really see myself pulling off a big endo and faceplant in some beargrass, lupine, and a rock :-)
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